NewsBits

FROM THE PAGES OF YESTERDAY

Little dispatches from the newspapers of yesterday. Check back often as we continually add to this collection.

Mr. Postmaster
Wisconsin postmasters appointed: Henry Treutel, at Aurora, Washington County, Wis., vice John C. Kuhlman, resigned. (The Weekly Wisconsin, October 13, 1888, Page 8)

Ida Treutel Engaged
The engagement of Miss Ida Freutel (sic) to Mr. Ed Grundemann (sic) is announced. (The Sunday Inter Ocean, Chicago, June 12, 1892, Page 10)

A 12-Pounder
John Treutel wears a big smile now. It’s a twelve pound boy. (The Marshfield News, September 29, 1898, Page 8)

A Sibling Visit
Mrs. Tyrtle (sic: Treutel) of Ottawa is visiting her brothers, the Messrs. Krosch, at the present writing. (The Waukesha Freeman, March 8, 1900, Page 5)

Home for Easter
Lake Beulah — Misses Krosch and Cecelia Hunter are spending their Easter vacation at home. Both the young ladies are attending school at Burlington. (The Waukesha Freeman, April 12, 1900, Page 5)

Thresh That Grain!
The Winter & Treutel threshing machine is doing well. They have all the work the machine can do. (The Marshfield News, August 22, 1901, Page 12)

Blood Poisoning
Mrs. Frank Lydek (sic – Ladick) has been quite sick the past week caused from blood poison setting in a cut on the back of her hand, she is now out of danger under the care of Dr. F.A. Goedecke. (Grand Rapids Tribune, October 26, 1901, Page 8)

Treutel Tunes
The Vesper people did not know there was a band in town until Wednesday evening, when the four Treutel Brothers came out and surprised the people by playing a few pieces. Come out again, boys. (The Daily Tribune, November 9, 1901, Page 8)

A Sad Day
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Treutel (Warren Mark Treutel) was buried at Grand Rapids on Sunday. (Grand Rapids Tribune, February 8, 1902, Page 8)

Building Activity
Indications are that quite a number of buildings will be erected here during the coming season. Henry and Chas. Treutel, John Reuss and a Mr. Spencer each have a part of the material on the ground for residences. It is said that a large double store building will be built. Other improvements are also talked of. (Wisconsin Valley Leader, March 6, 1902, Page 2).

Farm Machinery
“H. and C. Treutel have taken the agency for Deering harvesting machinery and have machines on hand for exhibition.” (Wisconsin Valley Leader, March 13, 1902, Page 2)

A New Barn
Treutel Brothers have just completed a large barn on their premises. (Grand Rapids Tribune, April 26, 1902, Page 10)

A Modern Residence
Contractor John P. Sanders is progressing rapidly with the work on the Henry Treutel house, and when completed it will be one of the most modern residences in Vesper. (Grand Rapids Tribune, May 31, 1902, Page 8)

Haulin’ Logs
Rozellville: Otto Schmidt and John Treutel are hauling the balance of their hardwood logs which they could not get out last winter on account of the snow leaving so early in the spring. They are hauling same to R. Connor Co.’s camp on Stratford road. (The Marshfield News, June 12, 1902, Page 5)

A Good Hunt
Henry Treutel and B. Mudey (sic) shot two large wolves and a deer last week. (Grand Rapids Tribune, November 26, 1902, Page 8)

A New Baby
“Miss Barbara Garlack (sic) returned to her home in Eagle Wednesday after a pleasant visit at the home of her sister, Mrs. H. Treutel. … Mr. and Mrs. Henry Treutel are happy over the arrival of a son.” (Wood County Reporter, September 18, 1903, Page 4)

Family Illness
Henry Treutel has been called away by the serious sickness of his mother-in-law. He left Tuesday morning on the 9:30 train for Eagle. While he is gone, Mrs. Treutel and baby are staying with the old folks. …Oscar Treutel is slowly improving in health. He has been sick the past week with the grip. (Grand Rapids Tribune, January 20, 1904, Page 8)

Runaway Horses
John Reuss had a run-away last week. He went into Treutel’s store one cold morning, leaving his team without tying them. When he came out, the team was flying up the road with the milk cans strung along the road. No damage was done. (The Daily Tribune, January 27, 1904, Page 8)

A Cottage
William Hanneman is building a four-room cottage upon his lot in the second ward. Knute Knuteson is the carpenter assisted by Mr. Hanneman. (Wood County Reporter, May 6, 1904, Page 4)

Welcome Baby Ruby
Vesper: Mr. and Mrs. Walter Treutel are the happy parents of a baby girl born June 22. (Wisconsin Valley Leader, July 7, 1904, Page 2)

Farm Implements
Vesper: John Flanagan and Treutels report a very satisfactory sale of haying machinery for this season. The farmers claim that they could do better here than elsewhere and it looked like it to judge by the amount of machinery that went away from here. (Grand Rapids Tribune, July 13, 1904, Page 8)

Horses Poisoned
Grand Rapids Tribune: A queer case, the like of which is seldom heard, has come to light near the village of Vesper. Messrs. Treutel and Carlin of that place recently lost a horse from some unusual cause, and investigation proved that the cause of death had been poison, Paris green being the drug used. A search was made in the pasture where the horses were confined and a salt lick was discovered, where Paris green had been mixed in with the salt, making it plainly apparent how the horses had met their death. Although a thorough investigation was made by the officers of the law, no clew was discovered as to who the guilty party was, and the only thing possible was to give up the search.

Only a few months ago, a barn belonging to Mr. Treutel was burned, and from the evidence obtainable after the occurrence of the fire, it was evident that the building had been set fire by some person, but it was impossible to discover the guilty party. It is evident that there is a dangerous person living in the neighborhood of Vesper, and it is a pity that the officers of the law cannot apprehend the guilty party and make him suffer for his misdeeds. (The Marshfield News, July 6, 1905, Page 4)

Death in the Family
Mrs. August Hanneman died at the home of her son, Robert A. Hanneman, at Kellner Saturday noon. Deceased was an old resident of that section and was seventy-two years old at the time of her death, which was caused by rheumatic exhaustion.” (Wood County Reporter, April 11, 1907, Page 1)

Sick Calls
Harold Treutel has been seriously ill, but is getting better now. Dr. Hogan and Whitehorn attended him. (Wood County Reporter, September 9, 1909, Page 3)

Ruby is Ill
Ruby, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Treutel, is very ill. Two doctors were called in Sunday. (Wood County Reporter, April 10, 1910, Page 8)

Vesper Happenings
Mrs. Chas. Treutel left on Tuesday morning for an extended visit with her relatives at North Prairie. Miss Emma Moody of Plainfield visited friends and relatives here Sunday. The one-year-old baby girl of Mr. and Mrs. Wm Cole is quite sick with pneumonia at this writing. Mrs. Margaret Cole and Mrs. Will Cole expect to leave in a short time for an extended visit in the state of Washington. (Grand Rapids Tribune, June 1, 1910, Page 4)

Shovel Cuts
“Little Harold Treutel got a bad cut under his left eye, through the carelessness of one of his playmates who threw an ash shovel at him.” (Wood County Reporter, Jan. 19, 1911, Page 8)

Henry Buys Land
Clifford R. Goldsworthy of Vesper, (sold) to Henry Treutel of the same place, S 1-2 of lot 5 and part of lot 8 block one of the village of Vesper. (Wood County Reporter, June 8, 1914, Page 8)

Marvin Treutel is Born
A baby boy arrived at the Wallie Treutel home the 14th, and Sunday it was thought it could not live until morning, so a trained nurse was hired to take care of it, and it’s getting along nicely now. …Wallie Treutel sold his team to Mr. Bauman and he will get something lighter for his mail wagon. (Wood County Reporter, April 20, 1916, Page 4)

Insane Escapee
An insane man escaped from the asylum at Marshfield last Friday, the 24th. He had walked all the way and was stopping at Treutel’s store when it was noticed that he did not act quite normal, so constable Bean and son took him to the Rapids, where the next day he was taken back to the Marshfield asylum. (Wood County Reporter, Dec. 7, 1916, Page 6)

Meetings at Treutel Hall
The Seneca, Rudolph and Sigel Fire Insurance Co. met at the Treutel hall the Second of January. …The Farmers’ Equity held a business meeting at the Treutel hall Jan. 4. (Wood County Reporter, January 11, 1917, Page 6)

Candy for Christmas
Dear Santa Claus: I wont (sic) some candy. I wont a dolly, a trunk and a stove. Merry Christmas. Lots of love. – Margaret Cole (Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune, December 22, 1921, Page 3)

Baby Russell Dies
Russell, the two year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Cole of Nekoosa passed away Saturday after a prolonged illness of pneumonia. Funeral services were held at the home Monday morning, Rev. C.A. O’Neil officiating. Interment was made in Forest Hill cemetery at Wisconsin Rapids. Mr. and Mrs. Cole have the sympathy of the entire community. The following relatives from out of town attended the funeral: Mrs. M.J. Cole, Fond du Lac; Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Cole, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Treutel, Mr. and Mrs. John Adams, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Goldehamer (sic – Goldammer) and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ladick of Vesper. (Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune, January 25, 1922, Page 4)

Death of Mrs. Margaret Cole
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Cole were called to Wisconsin Rapids yesterday (sic – today) by the death of Mrs. Margaret Cole, Mr. Cole’s mother.  Mrs. Cole passed away at 10:20 o’clock this morning as a result of an attack of paralysis at the home of her son, William Cole, 218 Eighth St. S. Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. at the M.E. church, Rev. A.A. Bennett officiating. Burial will be in Forest Hill Cemetery.  (Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune, March 10, 1923, Page 7, Page 1)

Margaret Cole, 11, Dies of Pneumonia
Margaret Cole, 11-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Cole of this city, passed away late Saturday evening at the St. Joseph’s hospital in Marshfield where she had been a patient for five days. She had been suffering from pneumonia for about 12 days before her death, the illness starting from an abscess in the ear. Deceased was born in Vesper on July 7, 1915 and has made her home here with her parents for a number of years. She is survived by her father and mother, one brother, Guy, and a sister, Joy. Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at the First Methodist Episcopal Church, the Rev. Douglas O. Anderson officiating. Burial will be made in Forest Hill Cemetery. (Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune, May 16, 1927, Page 1)

4-H Club Entertains
The Vesper 4-H club members closed a successful season with a get-together and six o’clock supper Wednesday evening at the home of Mrs. G.H. Horn, club leader. …A pantomime entitled “Pokey Huntus” was given with Nina Treutel as reader. …Much credit is due the entertainment committee, namely, Elaine Treutel, Nina Mae Beebe, Douglas Conklin and George Osenga. (Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune, December 31, 1931)

Walter’s Birthday Party
Vesper — Misses Nina and Elaine Treutel entertained a number of relatives and friends at their home Wednesday evening in observance of the birthday anniversary of their father, Walter Treutel. Cards furnished the pastime of the evening, Walter Treutel winning honors at skat and Mrs. Harry Cole and Arthur Zabel winning at 500. A lunch was served at the close of the evening. Out of town guests were: Mr. and Mrs. James Larsen and daughter, Sondra; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Cole and sons; Mr. and Mrs. Alson Cole and daughter and Lawrence Wilson, all of Nekoosa; and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Hanneman and sons and Miss Evelyn Johnson, Wisconsin Rapids. (Marshfield News-Herald, August 4, 1933, Page 7)

Century of Progress
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Hanneman and sons, Donn Gene and David, accompanied by Oscar Treutel of Arpin, returned last evening from Waukegan, where they have been guests the past few days. En route they attended the Century of Progress at Chicago. (Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune, October 23, 1934, Page 6)

Hurt in Fall from Auto
Donn Gene Hanneman, 11-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Hanneman of Mauston, former residents here, was improving today at the Mauston hospital, where he was taken Thursday with a concussion of the brain following an accident in which he fell from the running board of a car while riding into Mauston from the Juneau County fair grounds. He will be confined to his bed for two weeks, however. Following an examination at the clinic, he complained of severe headaches and was taken home by his father and soon after lost his power of speech and all consciousness. He was then rushed to the hospital. His condition was somewhat improved on Friday but it was not until Saturday that he was able to take any nourishment. (Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune, August 23, 1937, Page 10)

County Home Matron
Mrs. Emma Carlin of this city, who was assistant to Mrs. Geo. Blank in the county asylum the last seven months, has become matron of the county home, assuming her new duties on Monday of this week, succeeding Mrs. Anthony Weasley, who served the county fourteen years in the two institutions, as cook in the asylum and in the county home during ten years, and as matron of the county home the last four years. (West Bend Pilot, January 18, 1939)

Victory Tomato!
Donn Hanneman brought a pear-shape tomato to the Star office the first of the week on which a well-defined letter V appears. It looks as thought the vegetables are trying to rival those hens that have been laying those eggs with the famous V for victory sign on them. (Mauston Star, September 1942)

Anniversary Celebration
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Treutel, 2041 Sixth Street South, will greet friends and relatives at an open house from 2 to 5 o’clock Sunday afternoon in honor of their golden wedding anniversary. Today is their actual anniversary date. (Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune, October 11, 1950, Page 10)

No Idle Retirement
Mr. and Mrs. Al Wonoski, Dousman, have just returned from a visit to Vesper, Wis., where they helped celebrate the 86th birthday of Mrs. Wonoski’s uncle, Charles Treutel. Mr. Treutel is retired and not content to just sit idle, he and his housekeeper, Mrs. Marie Peterson, spend their time making rag rugs which are worthy of blue ribbons at any fair. (Waukesha Daily Freeman, August 24, 1955, Page 7)

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